Utilize este identificador para referenciar este registo: http://hdl.handle.net/10400.18/4793
Registo completo
Campo DCValorIdioma
dc.contributor.authorBatista, Rita-
dc.contributor.authorFonseca, C.-
dc.contributor.authorPlanchon, Sébastien-
dc.contributor.authorNegrão, Sónia-
dc.contributor.authorRenaut, Jenny-
dc.contributor.authorOliveira, Margarida-
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-21T12:16:46Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-21T12:16:46Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-06-
dc.identifier.citationSci Rep. 2017 Sep 6;7(1):10624. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-09646-8pt_PT
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10400.18/4793-
dc.description.abstractThe approval of genetically modified (GM) crops is preceded by years of intensive research to demonstrate safety to humans and environment. We recently showed that in vitro culture stress is the major factor influencing proteomic differences of GM vs. non-GM plants. This made us question the number of generations needed to erase such “memory”. We also wondered about the relevance of alterations promoted by transgenesis as compared to environment-induced ones. Here we followed three rice lines (1-control, 1-transgenic and 1-negative segregant) throughout eight generations after transgenesis combining proteomics and transcriptomics, and further analyzed their response to salinity stress on the F6 generation. Our results show that: (a) differences promoted during genetic modification are mainly short-term physiological changes, attenuating throughout generations, and (b) environmental stress may cause far more proteomic/transcriptomic alterations than transgenesis. Based on our data, we question what is really relevant in risk assessment design for GM food crops.pt_PT
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT) Project PTDC/EBB-BIO/098983/2008 and research unit GREEN-it “Bioresources for Sustainability” (UID/Multi/04551/2013). S.N. acknowledges funding from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).pt_PT
dc.language.isoengpt_PT
dc.publisherNature Publishing Grouppt_PT
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/FCT/3599-PPCDT/98983/PTpt_PT
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/FCT/5876/147270/PTpt_PT
dc.rightsopenAccesspt_PT
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/pt_PT
dc.subjectGM Plantspt_PT
dc.subjectTranscriptomic Changespt_PT
dc.subjectProteomic Changespt_PT
dc.subjectEnvironmental Stresspt_PT
dc.subjectMolecular Engineering in Plantspt_PT
dc.subjectSaltpt_PT
dc.subjectGenetically Modified Foodpt_PT
dc.subjectSegurança Alimentarpt_PT
dc.subjectComposição de Alimentos-
dc.titleEnvironmental stress is the major cause of transcriptomic and proteomic changes in GM and non-GM plantspt_PT
dc.typearticlept_PT
dc.peerreviewedyespt_PT
dc.description.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionpt_PT
degois.publication.firstPage10624pt_PT
degois.publication.titleScientific Reportspt_PT
degois.publication.volume7(1)pt_PT
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-09646-8pt_PT
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-09646-8pt_PT
Aparece nas colecções:DAN - Artigos em revistas internacionais

Ficheiros deste registo:
Ficheiro Descrição TamanhoFormato 
Environmental stress is the major cause of transcriptomic and proteomic changes in GM and non-GM plants.pdf7,16 MBAdobe PDFVer/Abrir


FacebookTwitterDeliciousLinkedInDiggGoogle BookmarksMySpace
Formato BibTex MendeleyEndnote Degois 

Todos os registos no repositório estão protegidos por leis de copyright, com todos os direitos reservados.